Christopher R. Jacobs

Professor of Biomedical Engineering

351 Engineering Terrace
1210 Amsterdam Avenue, Mail Code: 8904
New York, NY 10027

Phone: +1 212 851 0271
Fax: +1 212-854-8725
Email: crj2111@columbia.edu

Research Areas:

Understanding the molecular mechanisms that allow cells of the skeletal system to sense and respond to mechanical stimulation.

Cell and Molecular Bioengineering Lab

Education

  • 1994, PhD, Mechanical Engineering, Stanford
  • 1989, MS, Mechanical Engineering, Stanford
  • 1988, BS, Systems Science and Mathematics, Washington University

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

  • 1994-2001 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Pennsylvania State University
  • 2001-2008 Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University
  • 2008-Present Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia Univeristy

Selected Publications

  1. Kwon RY, Lew AJ, and Jacobs CR. A microstructurally informed model for the mechanical response of three-dimensional actin networks. Comput Methods Biomech Biomed Engin 2008 Aug; 11(4) 407-18. pmid:18568835.
  2. Malone AM, Anderson CT, Tummala P, Kwon RY, Johnston TR, Stearns T, and Jacobs CR. Primary cilia mediate mechanosensing in bone cells by a calcium-independent mechanism. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2007 Aug 14; 104(33) 13325-30. pmid:17673554.
  3. You L, Temiyasathit S, Lee P, Kim CH, Tummala P, Yao W, Kingery W, Malone AM, Kwon RY, and Jacobs CR. Osteocytes as mechanosensors in the inhibition of bone resorption due to mechanical loading. Bone 2008 Jan; 42(1) 172-9. pmid:17997378.
  4. Kwon RY and Jacobs CR. Time-dependent deformations in bone cells exposed to fluid flow in vitro: investigating the role of cellular deformation in fluid flow-induced signaling. J Biomech 2007; 40(14) 3162-8. pmid:17559856.
  5. Malone AM, Batra NN, Shivaram G, Kwon RY, You L, Kim CH, Rodriguez J, Jair K, and Jacobs CR. The role of actin cytoskeleton in oscillatory fluid flow-induced signaling in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 2007 May; 292(5) C1830-6. pmid:17251324.
  6. Kim CH, You L, Yellowley CE, and Jacobs CR. Oscillatory fluid flow-induced shear stress decreases osteoclastogenesis through RANKL and OPG signaling. Bone 2006 Nov; 39(5) 1043-7. pmid:16860618.
  7. Rubin J, Rubin C, and Jacobs CR. Molecular pathways mediating mechanical signaling in bone. Gene 2006 Feb 15; 367 1-16. pmid:16361069.
  8. Batra NN, Li YJ, Yellowley CE, You L, Malone AM, Kim CH, and Jacobs CR. Effects of short-term recovery periods on fluid-induced signaling in osteoblastic cells. J Biomech 2005 Sep; 38(9) 1909-17. pmid:16023480.
  9. Li YJ, Batra NN, You L, Meier SC, Coe IA, Yellowley CE, and Jacobs CR. Oscillatory fluid flow affects human marrow stromal cell proliferation and differentiation. J Orthop Res 2004 Nov; 22(6) 1283-9. pmid:15475210.
  10. Malone AM, Batra NN, Shivaram G, Kwon RY, You L, Kim CH, Rodriguez J, Jair K, and Jacobs CR. The role of actin cytoskeleton in oscillatory fluid flow-induced signaling in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 2007 May; 292(5) C1830-6. pmid:17251324.

Understanding the molecular mechanisms that allow cells of the skeletal system to sense and respond to mechanical stimulation.


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